"Don’t ever feel bad for making a decision that upsets other people. You are not responsible for their happiness. You are responsible for your happiness."

Isaiah Henkel (via wolf-cub)

(Source: onlinecounsellingcollege, via dosed-by-you)

190,966 notes

kayveedee:

notyourexrotic:


This week, India became the first Asian nation to reach Mars when its orbiter entered the planet’s orbit on Wednesday — and this is the picture that was seen around the world to mark this historic event. It shows a group of female scientists at the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) congratulating one another on the mission’s success. The picture was widely shared on Twitter where Egyptian journalist and women’s rights activist Mona El-Tahawy tweeted: “Love this pic so much. When was the last time u saw women scientists celebrate space mission?” In most mission room photos of historic space events or in films about space, women are rarely seen, making this photo both compelling and unique. Of course, ISRO, like many technical agencies, has far to go in terms of achieving gender balance in their workforce. As Rhitu Chatterjee of PRI’s The World observed in an op-ed, only 10 percent of ISRO’s engineers are female.This fact, however, Chatterjee writes, is “why this new photograph of ISRO’s women scientists is invaluable. It shatters stereotypes about space research and Indian women. It forces society to acknowledge and appreciate the accomplishments of female scientists. And for little girls and young women seeing the picture, I hope it will broaden their horizons, giving them more options for what they can pursue and achieve.” To read Chatterjee’s op-ed on The World, visit http://bit.ly/1u3fvGZPhoto credit: Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images

- A Mighty Girl

Guys this is the coolest thing ever and this makes me proud to be an Indian lady and everyone needs to know about this RIGHT NOW

kayveedee:

notyourexrotic:

This week, India became the first Asian nation to reach Mars when its orbiter entered the planet’s orbit on Wednesday — and this is the picture that was seen around the world to mark this historic event. It shows a group of female scientists at the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) congratulating one another on the mission’s success. 

The picture was widely shared on Twitter where Egyptian journalist and women’s rights activist Mona El-Tahawy tweeted: “Love this pic so much. When was the last time u saw women scientists celebrate space mission?” 

In most mission room photos of historic space events or in films about space, women are rarely seen, making this photo both compelling and unique. Of course, ISRO, like many technical agencies, has far to go in terms of achieving gender balance in their workforce. As Rhitu Chatterjee of PRI’s The World observed in an op-ed, only 10 percent of ISRO’s engineers are female.

This fact, however, Chatterjee writes, is “why this new photograph of ISRO’s women scientists is invaluable. It shatters stereotypes about space research and Indian women. It forces society to acknowledge and appreciate the accomplishments of female scientists. And for little girls and young women seeing the picture, I hope it will broaden their horizons, giving them more options for what they can pursue and achieve.” 

To read Chatterjee’s op-ed on The World, visit http://bit.ly/1u3fvGZ

Photo credit: Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images

- A Mighty Girl

Guys this is the coolest thing ever and this makes me proud to be an Indian lady and everyone needs to know about this RIGHT NOW

(via dosed-by-you)

32,259 notes

liompayne:

"what did u do all day?"

image

(Source: swedishpapa, via flashbacksandfireworks)

367,825 notes

nprglobalhealth:

Grieving But Grateful, Ebola Survivors In Liberia Give Back
Harrison Sakilla, a 39-year-old former teacher, can’t stop smiling.
"I have to smile," he says. "I’m the first survivor for the case management center here from Ebola."
Former patients like Sakilla, who’ve recovered from the virus, lift the collective spirit at at the Doctors Without Borders Ebola center in Liberia’s northern town of Foya. He was admitted to the high-risk isolation unit, which is part of a cluster of large tents that make up the bulk of the center.
While health workers busy themselves caring for patients on one side — with all the stress, hard work, death and sorrow that entails – there’s an oasis of joy and relief on the other side, where a few brick buildings stand to the right.
That’s where Ebola survivors congregate.
But their smiles may mask deep sorrow. “I’m very fine, even though I’ve lost seven [family members],” says Sakilla.
He starts to list them: “My father, my mother, my sister, my niece, my big brother and my niece’s daughter,” he says. “But right now I’m alive, I’m very, very, very happy. You see me smiling — nothing but smiling.”
Sakilla and other survivors gather together in their own little center, beyond the pop-up tents. Several are helping Doctors Without Borders, looking after orphaned children and performing other tasks.
Continue reading.
Photo: Bendu Borlay, 21 and an Ebola survivor, is caring for an infant whose mother died of the disease. (Tommy Trenchard for NPR)

nprglobalhealth:

Grieving But Grateful, Ebola Survivors In Liberia Give Back

Harrison Sakilla, a 39-year-old former teacher, can’t stop smiling.

"I have to smile," he says. "I’m the first survivor for the case management center here from Ebola."

Former patients like Sakilla, who’ve recovered from the virus, lift the collective spirit at at the Doctors Without Borders Ebola center in Liberia’s northern town of Foya. He was admitted to the high-risk isolation unit, which is part of a cluster of large tents that make up the bulk of the center.

While health workers busy themselves caring for patients on one side — with all the stress, hard work, death and sorrow that entails – there’s an oasis of joy and relief on the other side, where a few brick buildings stand to the right.

That’s where Ebola survivors congregate.

But their smiles may mask deep sorrow. “I’m very fine, even though I’ve lost seven [family members],” says Sakilla.

He starts to list them: “My father, my mother, my sister, my niece, my big brother and my niece’s daughter,” he says. “But right now I’m alive, I’m very, very, very happy. You see me smiling — nothing but smiling.”

Sakilla and other survivors gather together in their own little center, beyond the pop-up tents. Several are helping Doctors Without Borders, looking after orphaned children and performing other tasks.

Continue reading.

Photo: Bendu Borlay, 21 and an Ebola survivor, is caring for an infant whose mother died of the disease. (Tommy Trenchard for NPR)

375 notes

The first time I saw a Narcan resurrection

thatpunkrockerkid:

emtgin:

image

Medic: wanna see somethin cool?
Me: *suspicious/curious look*
Medic: *slams narcan*
Pt: Fuck you!! *projectile vomits*

it aint pretty

(via medicalexamination)

173 notes

even-more-nclex-questions:

A nurse is completing her annual cardiopulmonary resuscitation training. The class instructor tells her that a client has fallen off a ladder and is lying on his back; he is unconscious and isn’t breathing. What maneuver should the nurse use to open his airway?

a) Head tilt-chin lift

b) Jaw-thrust

c) Heimlich

d) Seldinger

Read More

15 notes

elops:

A normal ECG on top, and an ECG of a patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and atrial fibrillation below.

I couldn’t not share this.

(via adenosinetriesphosphate)

253 notes

alexbluebonnets:

Holy shit.

alexbluebonnets:

Holy shit.

(via seventoinfinity)

120,911 notes

magicalnaturetour:

Praying Mantis Rides Snail Through Borneo Jungle. (Photos by Nordin Seruyan/Barcroft Media)

(via dosed-by-you)

59,471 notes